get-on-the-carousel:

I LOVED her in that movie 100% more than Greta Garbo…
Joan FTW!

get-on-the-carousel:

I LOVED her in that movie 100% more than Greta Garbo…

Joan FTW!

deforest:


“Clark and Joan’s relationship was complex and passionate. Their love affair was intermittent in between their respective marriages through the years. I believe their love affair never truly ended, but was interrupted by each other’s marriages.”

Casey LaLonde, grandson of Joan Crawford

deforest:

“Clark and Joan’s relationship was complex and passionate. Their love affair was intermittent in between their respective marriages through the years. I believe their love affair never truly ended, but was interrupted by each other’s marriages.”

Casey LaLonde, grandson of Joan Crawford


Screen star Joan Crawford, aware of the need for day nurseries to care for the children between the ages of two and six who’s parents are employed in war industries, broached the idea to the American Women’s Voluntary Services, was made California State Chairman of their nursery project and was the principal worker in founding the nursery in Sawtelle, a suburb of Los Angeles. Fifty children are cared for six days a week from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. while their mothers work, many in the nearby Douglas plant in Santa Monica. Joan pays the rent, installed the furnishings, financed necessary repairs and visits the nursery regularly to help care for and entertain the children.
Here she arrives early at the nursery with a carload of toys for the children.

Screen star Joan Crawford, aware of the need for day nurseries to care for the children between the ages of two and six who’s parents are employed in war industries, broached the idea to the American Women’s Voluntary Services, was made California State Chairman of their nursery project and was the principal worker in founding the nursery in Sawtelle, a suburb of Los Angeles. Fifty children are cared for six days a week from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. while their mothers work, many in the nearby Douglas plant in Santa Monica. Joan pays the rent, installed the furnishings, financed necessary repairs and visits the nursery regularly to help care for and entertain the children.

Here she arrives early at the nursery with a carload of toys for the children.


Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford both starred in Grand Hotel in 1932. Crawford, who had no scenes with Garbo, was determined to get a look at her. No visitors were allowed on a Garbo set while she was filming and her fellow MGM contract players were not suppose to take the same route as Garbo did from her dressing room to the movie set. Crawford dared to take the same stairs as Garbo and came face to face with her idol. According to Crawford, “She stopped and cupped my face in her hands and said, ‘What a pity. Our first picture together, and we don’t work with each other. I am so sorry. You have a marvelous face.’ If there was ever a time in my life I might have become a lesbian that was it.”

Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford both starred in Grand Hotel in 1932. Crawford, who had no scenes with Garbo, was determined to get a look at her. No visitors were allowed on a Garbo set while she was filming and her fellow MGM contract players were not suppose to take the same route as Garbo did from her dressing room to the movie set. Crawford dared to take the same stairs as Garbo and came face to face with her idol. According to Crawford, “She stopped and cupped my face in her hands and said, ‘What a pity. Our first picture together, and we don’t work with each other. I am so sorry. You have a marvelous face.’ If there was ever a time in my life I might have become a lesbian that was it.”


Referring to the trendsetting makeup styles Joan Crawford initiated in the early 1930s, which replaced the genteel prettiness of the 20s with a more sculptured, mature look, Crawford remarked, ‘Everybody imitated my fuller mouth, my darker eyebrows. But I wouldn’t copy anybody. If I can’t be me, I don’t want to be anybody. I was born that way.’

Referring to the trendsetting makeup styles Joan Crawford initiated in the early 1930s, which replaced the genteel prettiness of the 20s with a more sculptured, mature look, Crawford remarked, ‘Everybody imitated my fuller mouth, my darker eyebrows. But I wouldn’t copy anybody. If I can’t be me, I don’t want to be anybody. I was born that way.’