"I tried to stay away…I fought…I prayed…I lied to myself…But in the end, I had to see you."

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert in Flesh and the Devil (Clarence Brown, 1926)

harlow-jean:

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert on the set of Love (1927)

harlow-jean:

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert on the set of Love (1927)

fuckyeahjohngilbert:

John Gilbert and Greta Garbo relaxing by the pool, 1920s

fuckyeahjohngilbert:

John Gilbert and Greta Garbo relaxing by the pool, 1920s

nazi-julieandrews:

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert in Flesh and the Devil

smallnartless:

The first scene between John Gilbert and Greta Garbo, in the train station, was also the first time Gilbert every saw Garbo. He falls in love on camera, so completely in love that he never went back home to his wife

(Source: IMDB)


John Gilbert wrestles with Greta Garbo on the set of ‘Flesh and the Devil’, directed by Clarence Brown, 1926

John Gilbert wrestles with Greta Garbo on the set of ‘Flesh and the Devil’, directed by Clarence Brown, 1926

John Gilbert was cast in the bad film West of Broadway, 1931— in the hope that Gilbert’s contract could then be broken“People—just people—put the stamp of disapproval on Jack Gilbert’s voice. They thought it didn’t match his personality. Was this true? I remember it being vibrant, alive—like he was. It is true that his onscreen diction was overly precise and made him sound pedantic at times, but this could have been overcome. But when the fan magazines wrote that he was doomed, Jack began to believe that he was. The fear of failure robbed him of the most necessary thing for an actor—his ego. Without it, he was lost.”Norma Shearer  
John Gilbert was cast in the bad film West of Broadway, 1931— in the hope that Gilbert’s contract could then be broken

“People—just people—put the stamp of disapproval on Jack Gilbert’s voice. They thought it didn’t match his personality. Was this true? I remember it being vibrant, alive—like he was. It is true that his onscreen diction was overly precise and made him sound pedantic at times, but this could have been overcome. But when the fan magazines wrote that he was doomed, Jack began to believe that he was. The fear of failure robbed him of the most necessary thing for an actor—his ego. Without it, he was lost.”
Norma Shearer 
 

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert in Flesh & The Devil (Clarence Brown - 1926)

Greta Garbo & John Gilbert in Flesh & The Devil (Clarence Brown - 1926)