oldhollywood:

Orson Welles on the set of Macbeth (1948, dir. Orson Welles)
“You could write all the ideas of all the movies, mine included, on  the head of a pin. It’s not a form in which ideas are very fecund. It’s a  form that may grip you or take you into a world or involve you  emotionally—but ideas are not the subject of films. I have this terrible  sense that film is dead, that it’s a piece of film in a machine that  will be run off and shown to people. That is why, I think, my films are  theatrical, and strongly stated, because I can’t believe that anybody  won’t fall asleep unless they are. There’s an awful lot of Bergman and  Antonioni that I’d rather be dead than sit through.
For myself, unless a film is hallucinatory, unless it becomes that  kind of an experience, it doesn’t come alive. I know that directors find  serious and sensitive audiences for films where people sit around  peeling potatoes in the peasant houses—but I can’t read that kind of  novel either. Somebody has to be knocking at the door—I figure that is  the way Shakespeare thought, so I can’t be in bad company!”
-Orson Welles

oldhollywood:

Orson Welles on the set of Macbeth (1948, dir. Orson Welles)

“You could write all the ideas of all the movies, mine included, on the head of a pin. It’s not a form in which ideas are very fecund. It’s a form that may grip you or take you into a world or involve you emotionally—but ideas are not the subject of films. I have this terrible sense that film is dead, that it’s a piece of film in a machine that will be run off and shown to people. That is why, I think, my films are theatrical, and strongly stated, because I can’t believe that anybody won’t fall asleep unless they are. There’s an awful lot of Bergman and Antonioni that I’d rather be dead than sit through.

For myself, unless a film is hallucinatory, unless it becomes that kind of an experience, it doesn’t come alive. I know that directors find serious and sensitive audiences for films where people sit around peeling potatoes in the peasant houses—but I can’t read that kind of novel either. Somebody has to be knocking at the door—I figure that is the way Shakespeare thought, so I can’t be in bad company!”

-Orson Welles

Joan Fontaine screen test for Rebecca

PHOTO PERSONALITY MEME | answer the questions below by using the flickr search engine, choose a photo from the first 3 pages, post your results
1. your name 2. your favorite food 3. your favorite color 4. celebrity crush [currently] 5. what i want to be when i grow up 6. dream vacation 7. favorite drink 8. what i love most in the world 9. your username

PHOTO PERSONALITY MEME | answer the questions below by using the flickr search engine, choose a photo from the first 3 pages, post your results

1. your name 2. your favorite food 3. your favorite color 4. celebrity crush [currently] 5. what i want to be when i grow up 6. dream vacation 7. favorite drink 8. what i love most in the world 9. your username
oldhollywood:

Suddenly, Last Summer (1959, dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz) (via)
“Man devours man in a metaphorical sense. He feeds upon his fellow creatures, without the excuse of animals. Animals actually do it for survival, out of hunger…. I use that metaphor [of cannibalism] to express my repulsion with this characteristic of man, the way people use each other without conscience: ‘We all use each other and that’s what we think of as love.’
It horrified me, the film. [Producer] Sam Spiegel made the mistake of inviting me to a private screening of it in his apartment and I walked out in the middle of it. I was so offended by the literal approach because the play was metaphorical; it was sort of a poem, I thought. I loved Katharine Hepburn in it, but I didn’t like the film. 
…[The death by cannibalism scene] became so realistic, with the boys chasing Sebastian up the hill - I thought it was a travesty. It was about how people devour each other in an allegorical sense.”
-Tennessee Williams, Conversations with Tennessee Williams

oldhollywood:

Suddenly, Last Summer (1959, dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz) (via)

“Man devours man in a metaphorical sense. He feeds upon his fellow creatures, without the excuse of animals. Animals actually do it for survival, out of hunger…. I use that metaphor [of cannibalism] to express my repulsion with this characteristic of man, the way people use each other without conscience: ‘We all use each other and that’s what we think of as love.’

It horrified me, the film. [Producer] Sam Spiegel made the mistake of inviting me to a private screening of it in his apartment and I walked out in the middle of it. I was so offended by the literal approach because the play was metaphorical; it was sort of a poem, I thought. I loved Katharine Hepburn in it, but I didn’t like the film. 

…[The death by cannibalism scene] became so realistic, with the boys chasing Sebastian up the hill - I thought it was a travesty. It was about how people devour each other in an allegorical sense.”

-Tennessee Williams, Conversations with Tennessee Williams

Would you like me to tell you the little story of right-hand/left-hand? The story of good and evil? H-A-T-E! It was with this left hand that old brother Cain struck the blow that laid his brother low. L-O-V-E! You see these fingers, dear hearts? These fingers has veins that run straight to the soul of man. The right hand, friends, the hand of love. Now watch, and I’ll show you the story of life. Those fingers, dear hearts, is always a-warring and a-tugging, one agin t’other. Now watch ‘em! Old brother left hand, left hand he’s a fighting, and it looks like love’s a goner. But wait a minute! Hot dog, love’s a winning! Yessirree! It’s love that’s won, and old left hand hate is down for the count!

Some places are like people: some shine and some don’t. - The Shining (1980).

oldhollywood:

Romy Schneider, Orson Welles, and Anthony Perkins on the set of The Trial (1962, dir. Orson Welles)

Photos by Nicolas Tikhomiroff.

(via)